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Multimedia Projects Landing Page


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Multimedia Projects Landing Page


Multimedia Projects


Photography + Words

 

 
 Tree Whispers

Tree Whispers

 Inspirational Quotes

Inspirational Quotes

 

 

Photography + Video + Music

 
 Unfolding Presence

Unfolding Presence

 

 

Photography + Music

 

 Golijov's Tenebrae

Golijov's Tenebrae

 Brahm's Violin Sonata #3

Brahm's Violin Sonata #3

 Luna's Graffiti

Luna's Graffiti

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Tree Whispers Book


Tree Whispers Book


Photos + Words (book)

Tree Whispers

 

Tree Whispers emerged from a meditation on Life’s stillness and silence.  At every level of life, between the seeming silences and raging sound storms, threads of life quietly weave.  If we opened our hearts and listened, we could learn much from our subtle surroundings.

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Inspirational Quotes


Inspirational Quotes


Photos + Words

Quotes from Nature

Observing Nature gives rise to the deepest philosophy and inspiration.

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Unfolding Presence


Unfolding Presence


Photos + Video + Music

Unfolding Presence

 

Photography and Video by Carlin Ma

Music - "Portage" by Danny Clay

Created in support of Ebb and Flow Arts for their "Music of the Spheres" series, which an immersive planetarium experience with electronic, animation and film, with dynamic 20th and 21st century works.

"To what extent you are aware is the extent you are alive." ~Sadhguru

 

Nature is my greatest mentor, through her expressions of Silence, Life, and Flow. Away from complications of human civilization games, she teaches us simply how to be. She provides a spiritual sanctuary, a place to ponder the forms of natural art, arising from stillness. Layer by layer, we can unfold our inner presence through observing natural wonders. From the lyrical silence of mist, to the unveiling of bright landscapes, to the cornucopic varieties of creatures, which finally evolve into us, humankind stands in awe of our origin. When we connect to Nature, we find ourselves creating music and art.

Bringing together my life of music (www.carlinma.com) and photography has always been a dream, and it truly merged when I helped co-found and become Artistic Director o Hawaii International Music Festival's 2016 (www.himusicfestival.com). Robert Pollock, the director of Ebb and Flow Arts (multimedia, new music organization http://ebbandflowarts.org/), attended our Maui show and enjoyed my photo-music pairings. I was most humbled when he invited me to create a piece for their "Music of the Spheres" planetarium program.

Big thank you to nature, squirrels, Danny, Robert, and my partner who put up with my sleepless, marathon nights. Enjoy!

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Golijov's Tenebrae


Golijov's Tenebrae


Photos + Music

Photorama for Golijov's Tenebrae

 

 

>> Watch in HD for a better experience! <<

(Live audio recording from Blueprint’s season debut concert, 2012)

 

I was most excited when Nicole Paiement (director of Blueprint, San Francisco Conservatory of Music’s new music ensemble) asked me to pair my photographs with Osvaldo Golijov’s Tenebrae in their season debut concert.  For countless late night hours, Tenebrae lured me into its soulfully haunting world.  Visions of beautiful pain and agonizing delight inspired me to search for a deep visual lyricism.

 

My pictures are not meant to usurp the music’s beauty.  Rather, they function as a visual counterpoint, harmonizing with the music to express a common beauty.  I feel that Nature best expresses Tenebrae‘s complex beauty because she simultaneously sings of a divine cosmic balance while surging with chaotic turmoil.

 

Here are Golijov’s words on the composition - www.osvaldogolijov.com/wd33.htm

“I wrote Tenebrae as a consequence of witnessing two contrasting realities in a short period of time in September 2000. I was in Israel at the start of the new wave of violence that is still continuing today, and a week later I took my son to the new planetarium in New York, where we could see the Earth as a beautiful blue dot in space. I wanted to write a piece that could be listened to from different perspectives. That is, if one chooses to listen to it “from afar”, the music would probably offer a “beautiful” surface but, from a metaphorically closer distance, one could hear that, beneath that surface, the music is full of pain.”

 

 

For a view with the stage and performers -

 

Recorded live at Carol Hume Hall in San Francisco, USA

soprano – Sarah Eve Brand

clarinet – Lara Mitofsky Neuss

violin – Jaymes Kirksey, Amy Hillis

viola – Paula Karolak

cello – Laura Jacyna

photography – Carlin Ma

conductor – Nicole Paiement

 

 

For those curious about the logistics -

In the live performance, I actively cued each transition to match the musicians, but each picture had a predetermined transition duration (using Microsoft Powerpoint).  For the video with full screen photos, I had more refined control in Adobe Premiere Elements, where each fade in/out has different transition rates.  (I could manipulate the fades to have linear and curved progressions, allowing a closer correlation with the music.)

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Brahms Violin Sonata #3


Brahms Violin Sonata #3


Photos + Music

Brahms Violin Sonata #3

 

I was absolutely delighted when Michael Langlois approached me with the idea to pair one photograph per movement in his all Brahms Violin Sonata concert in Maryland.   It was my first photography-music collaboration, and what an exciting undertaking, as Brahms is one of my favorite composers, full of deep love and resonant life force.

In the performance, each of these photos were projected live during each movement. Enjoy our interpretation!

 

Live performance at University of Maryland

violin - Netanel Draiblate

piano - Michael Langlois

photo conception and credit - Carlin Ma

 
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Luna's Graffiti


Luna's Graffiti


Photos + Music

Luna's Graffiti in 11 movements

 

 

 "Armando Luna’s “Graffiti” consists of 11 “movements”/vignettes named for a inspiration/role model, including Benny Goodman, Chick Corea, G. Gershwin, and Alberto Ginastera. It’s a bracing kaleidoscope of 20th century modes and styles, with the accent on bracing—there’s nothing academic or didactic about this as a whole. "
~Mark Keresman, Jazz Review

 

 

live recording from a collaborative project with Blueprint Ensemble (directed by Nicole Paiement) in San Francisco
Movements -
1) J.S. Bach (0:00)
2) Bela Bartok  (1:59)
3) Dave Brubeck  (3:59)
4) Chick Corea (6:13)
5) Alfred Schnittke (7:57)
6) Benny Goodman (10:12)
7) Arthur Honegger (12:25)
8) Joseph Haydn (12:50)
9) Dmitri Shostakovich (16:34)
10) George Gershwin (18:25)
11) Alberto Ginastera (21:50)

 

My visual conception arises from enhancing the abstract, emotional intent of each movement with an abstract, textural photo.  The title and font are woven into the photograph, similar to the Chinese poems balancing and completing a painting.

Mexican Armando Luna’s “Graffiti” comes at you with a nod and a wink as he uses the styles of Bach, Bartok, Benny Goodman and others as the starting off point for his own gleefully raucous and busy idiom. This graffiti is not so much a blight as a sly and joyful adding of a mustache to our beloved musical icons.
— http://www.innova.mu/albums/present-music/graffiti